Private David Buchan

This is part of a series of essays about the First World War casualties commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission in New Hampshire.

The grave of David Buchan
The grave of David Buchan

Like his nine siblings, David Buchan was born in Scotland; he emigrated to the United States before the war. Buchan served in France with 42nd Battalion (Royal Highlanders) in 7th Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division, where he was wounded in the war’s latter stages during the ‘advance to victory’. Continue reading

Captain and Brevet Major Bernard Cecil Smyth-Pigott

This is part of a series of essays about the First World War casualties commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission in Connecticut.

The grave of Bernard Cecil Smyth-Pigott
The grave of Bernard Cecil Smyth-Pigott

Major Smyth-Pigott played an important role in the engagement between the War Office and the arms manufacturers in the United States that were contracted to supply rifles for the British Army in 1915 and 1916.

Bernard Cecil Smyth-Pigott was born on 5 November 1884 at Brockley Hall[1] in Somerset into a wealthy, landed family; he was the second son and second of the seven children of Cecil and Mary Smyth-Piggott.[2] On a sea journey in February 1893 to Colombo, his father fell overboard and drowned. Continue reading

Sergeant Michael Francis Moynihan

This is part of a series of essays about the First World War casualties commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission in Connecticut.

The grave of Michael Moynihan
The grave of Michael Moynihan

Michael Francis Moynihan served with the Canadian Expeditionary Force under the name Francis Henry Chapman. He was born on 24 March 1892 in South Manchester, one of the twelve children of Michael and Julia Moynahan.[1] His parents were both Irish immigrants, and his father and most of his siblings worked in the Cheney Brothers’ silk mill in the town; Moynihan worked as a clerk and stenographer. Continue reading

Cadet Kenneth MacDonald Kearney

This is part of a series of essays about the First World War casualties commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission in Connecticut.

The grave of Kenneth MacDonald Kearney
The grave of Kenneth MacDonald Kearney

Cadet Kenneth Kearney served briefly with the Royal Flying Corps in early 1918 before succumbing with pneumonia in Toronto during his initial training. He was born on 25 March 1894 in New Haven, Connecticut.[1] His father was born in New York of Irish parents; his mother was also born in New York but of Scottish parents; he was their only child. Continue reading

Private Winfield George Haviland

This is part of a series of essays about the First World War casualties commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission in Connecticut.

The grave of Winfield George Haviland
The grave of Winfield George Haviland

Winfield George Haviland was a United States citizen, whose service with the Canadian Expeditionary Force was limited to service in Canada as a result of illness. He was born on 4 February 1893 at Stamford, Connecticut, the only child of William and Eliza Haviland.[1] His father died in 1897 and in 1900, when he was seven years old, he was sent to Connecticut School for Boys;  the establishment provided an education for juvenile offenders and orphans. Continue reading

Private George Henry Chamberlain

This is part of a series of essays about the First World War casualties commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission in Connecticut.

The grave of George Chamberlain
The grave of George Chamberlain

George Henry Chamberlain was born on 1 August 1894 at Orono, Maine, the son of John and Mary Chamberlain and the middle of their seven children.[1] His family were French Canadians from New Brunswick, who had emigrated to the United States in 1888. His father was a machinist in the local mill of the Orono Pulp and Paper Co. Some of his brothers worked there too but George Chamberlain learned to drive and became a chauffeur. Continue reading