The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission

I am very pleased to announce that the project has been endorsed by:

WW1_logo_v2The project will advance the aims of the Commission[1] through:

Education: Informing national and local audiences about the participation of the United States and Americans in the First World War outwith the AEF.

Commemoration: Achieving recognition of the service and sacrifice of Americans, who may otherwise be forgotten because they were not serving with the AEF.

Memorials: Identifying and cataloguing memorials to American casualties, including CWGC and private grave markers, that may otherwise not be recognized.


1. (Back) ‘The Commission is responsible for planning, developing, and executing programs, projects, and activities to commemorate the centennial of World War One; encouraging private organizations and State and local governments to organize and participate in activities commemorating the centennial of World War I; facilitating and coordinating activities throughout the United States relating to the centennial of World War One; serving as a clearinghouse for the collection and dissemination of information about events and plans for the centennial of World War One; and developing recommendations for Congress and the President for commemorating the centennial of World War One.’

Cemeteries

The cemeteries and columbaria in which there are Commonwealth War Graves Commission commemorations are spread across 42 states.

We have now completed a survey of the cemeteries and have updated their names, addresses and locations. A list of cemeteries with zip codes, organised by state, may be found on this new page. Due to changes to cemetery names and addresses over the years, the details may differ from those shown on the CWGC website.

Sunburst Cemetery, Lake Logan, North Carolina and the grave of Private Baxter Franklin, who served in France and Flanders with the 10th Battalion, 1st Canadian Division and died in Toronto on 10 December 1918.
Sunburst Cemetery, Lake Logan, North Carolina and the grave of Private Baxter Franklin, who served in France and Flanders with the 10th Battalion, 1st Canadian Division and died in Toronto on 10 December 1918.